ALWAYS COME FROM THE SEA


Audio Installation
Reading by Terry Adkins

To the Moth chasing the Moon, I chanced upon an island whose shores are littered with the bones of the Sea, they cut to tread upon and drew blood from my feet. Some are dusty pink in colour and others white. They sit there, patient, waiting to return like the others sitting on the sea bed. I could see the other bones underwater, spilling over like colourful polyps itching to grow. I was left there for a time and couldn’t find my way back. I had to tread upon those polyps and heard the crunching sound of the bones as they crumbled beneath my weight. The water glittered blue and yellow in the darkness, I drew a line and saw it light my trail. Amongst it the smallest ball of blue calmly floated in front of me. I picked it up between my hands and stared long before it stopped shining. Then I returned it to the Sea. I threw myself into the open water, it’s weightlessness drew all around me. I sunk, like land-locked children who had never floated between those two depths. In the abyss and as clear as day I heard the chattering bleeps of the dolphins. They were some distance away, I did not know this at the time, and suppressed the urge to take a breath. Our chief Sangha had speared a sunfish and let out a 20 m line as it swam into the green depths, trailing blood from the barbed hook the Lamafa hunters set it with. I stood still, floating in the blue, half expecting something to prey upon it. I stared for a long time. I passed dark menacing rocks, the tongue of the south seas licking its bare open crevices. The sea was clear and dark green that late afternoon, and those black menacing rocks and visible in the fathoms below. There were hills covered in yellow nudi branches, I can’t see far beyond me, and then the sea divided itself tourmaline and cobalt blue. I turned left and saw the mouth of a large cave, vermillion green, and tossed with the current as it rocked me to and fro. I surfaced afterwards, and found myself alone again, floating on the waves as they carried me away. I closed my eyes. Hoping it would carry me far from the lands I had forsaken.

our_body

Title: Our Body
Year: 2013
Medium: C-Print on Diasec
Size: 29.7 x 42 x 2.5
Edition: 4 + 2AP

our_vows

Title: Our Vows
Year: 2013
Medium: C-Print on Diasec
Size: 29.7 x 42 x 2.5
Edition: 4 + 2AP

our_chief

LAMALERA, LEMBATA, FLORES
The Lamalera tribe practice traditional whaling rituals as part of their eucharistic ideas about consumption. They leap from a ‘peledang’ with a tipped 3 to 4 meter bamboo stick in order to catch what they call ‘knato’, meaning sustenance delivered by God. All their catch from the sea is deemed as ‘knato’ and ‘knato’ may not be caught unless it presents itself to be caught by the Lamafa hunters. Once the ultimate ‘knato’ is caught – that is the Sperm Whale – they boil the blood and eat the body in the manner of a eucharistic practice which transferred into their most recent conversion into Christianity. The similarities they found within their previous belief system to that of Christian ones enable them to adjust quite comfortably, whilst continuing to practice their more animistic beliefs.

our_blood

Title: Our Blood
Year: 2013
Medium: C-Print on Diasec
Size: 29.7 x 42 x 2.5
Edition: 4 + 2AP

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